Dog Training Young Woman with Dog

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Dog Sports : How To Train Your Dog For Sporting Events and Competitions

Dog breeds of all shapes and sizes and from all fitness levels can enjoy and benefit from several types of dog sports. Whether you have a toy breed or one that needs a little push in order to get motivated, you can get your dog involved in one of several types of canine sports.

Dogs enjoy the freedom and challenge of the sport, while the owners gain an opportunity to create a stronger bond with their canine pals.

Finding The Right Trainer For Your Dog

Taking part in sports and dog competitions is fun for both dogs and their owners. Once you’ve determined on the sport, find out what the requirements are to enter the competition. Next, you need to find an instructor who can guide you through the process or help you get more information. The trainer may be able to refer you to an association or club that can help you pick the sport that best suits your dog.

Find a qualified trainer to train both you and your dog. In most cases, you won’t find a piece of paper stating that the trainer is well-qualified, but one who has experience competing in the sport of your choice or other types of canine sports should be considered. The trainer should also possess knowledge on current training methods as well as information about upcoming events and trials.

Training Your Dog On How To Become An Athlete

For all the novices out there who are new to training with your dog for a specific dog sporting event, there are some key factors you must understand before beginning your training regimen.

The number one issue that comes up in the majority of dog owners who are new to dog sports is becoming overly frustrated when trying to teach dogs a new skill. It is important to remember that positive training is always the number one solution to your goals.  Avoid getting angry and do not sweat the small stuff, especially when you and your dog are both learning something new together.

Always remember that you have a choice in changing the sport if you see that your dog is not learning or enjoying himself. For example, if you start training for fly ball, and your dog is having a hard time by dropping the ball repeatedly, perhaps it’s time to consider teaching him disc dog or agility instead.

Spend as much time possible at teaching your dog. I realize that this sounds like a simple, common sense tip, but many people overlook it. The more time you spend with your dog, the more fun you’ll have, and the better he will perform.

Keep training for the specific sport of your choice fun for your dog. Use plenty of toys and dog treats, along with an abundance of praise and affection. Your goal is to motivate your dog to accomplish each small task for the sporting event you are training for. In time, he will be ready to rock ‘n roll and both of you can then take your chances at the next sporting event.

 



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